YESTERDAY’S BLOOMS

Post last updated: October 10th, 2018

Like most gardeners, I have a lot blooming right now. I worked up a sweat taking these photos because the humidity today, according to the weatherman, will make it feel like 100. Here are some of the highlights:

pansies in June in deep shade
pansies in June in deep shade
dietes bicolor has bloomed a lot this year
dietes bicolor has bloomed a lot this year
Simply Glorious daylily
Simply Glorious daylily – 6 inch bloom
Hibiscus 'Tropic Escape'
Hibiscus ‘Tropic Escape’
Coneflower Burpee Fordhook Collection
Coneflower
Rain knocked one stalk overnotice the flowers reach for the light
Rain knocked one stalk over
notice the flowers reach for the light
same group of coneflowers -- some are 2 ft, some 4 ft
same group of coneflowers — some are 2 ft, some 4 ft
pink jacobinia
pink jacobinia
powder puff-2432
close-up of flowers on Powder Puff Bush
Gallardia Cornetta
Gallardia Cornetta
Unnamed seedling by Daylilies of the Valley -- the color blows me away
Unnamed seedling by Daylilies of the Valley — the color blows me away

 

18 thoughts on “YESTERDAY’S BLOOMS”

    1. Blondie – Now ain’t that something? You and Kimmie both like the powder puff bush. It won’t grow in ya’lls neck of the woods and it freezes completely back even in my neck o’ the woods. Down around Orlando, though, I’ve seen them 7 feet tall because they don’t freeze back. I have to start over every year so mine seldom gets taller than 3 or 4 feet. Still, I like it because the bloom reminds me of those pink mimosa trees that you only see in the wild.

        1. Here, too, but I just don’t see that happening. They are along roadsides and undeveloped land but usually only one or two. I’ll admit to being afraid to plant them on my property, though, because of that reputation. My powder puff is as close as I could get to the “look” of a mimosa. I’ve probably had it 10 years and it is not invasive.

      1. There have not been blooming Mimosas here in 40 years and seedlings still come up in places where they’re not wanted. Those in what might be a desirable location take the wilt and I cut them down. There’s a 7 footer up against the south side of the house that I thought I cut every sprout off the stump this spring. Medusa Mimosa.

        What plants (not Mimosas) have you seen on my blog that you’d like seeds? Be warned that I am not one of those organized seed savers with neat little packets and boxes but I could try to get something saved and properly labeled for you if you are specific. (Sometimes I just dump all the early spring annuals into one container as I gather them and scatter them that way in the fall, since they’re not going to come up in a well-planned, orderly manner anyway.)

        1. I was particularly taken with your reddish yellow gladiola and I know they produce seeds. I would also like to play some more with trying to grow red hot poker from seed. I never see it in the plant nurseries although it supposedly grows in Zone 9. I have seeds I can trade. Right now I have some 2013 yellow and orange cosmos that really provide a POP of color (about 4 feet tall), 2014 red/white striped and blood-red amaryllis, luffa gourd and I think I might still have some purple speedwell that a pal sent me. I had my camera in the car today because Mr. Beekeeper’s rooster was standing in the middle of the road crowing up a storm so I took pics of the mimosas at 2 different locations. Pics are good enough for me when something is invasive.

    1. Kim — Too bad you ain’t around. I’d give you some of that bi-colored lily. I’ve got more than I need. You didn’t like the Simply Glorious daylily which has THREE beautiful blooms on it today?

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