ATLANTA BOTANICAL GARDEN PLANTS

Post last updated: October 10th, 2018

Entrance to the Atlanta Botanical Gardens
Entrance to the Atlanta Botanical Gardens

The first thing I noticed on arrival at the Atlanta Botanical Gardens was the amazing contrast used in their plantings.

ABG parking beds across fm entrance-1909

Shrimp plant and succulents planted together
Shrimp plant and succulents planted together
The plant in the background is another succulent, 'Sticks on Fire'
The plant in the background is another succulent,
‘Sticks on Fire’
Look at that contrast! Red elephant ear leaves, red impatiens, green ground cover
Look at that contrast!
Red elephant ear leaves, red impatiens, green ground cover
In the Camellia Garden
In the Camellia Garden

Atlanta Botanical Gardens’ 2004 exhibit featured internationally acclaimed artist Dale Chihuly. Two of his glass sculptures remain at the gardens.

Chihuly Nepenthes Chandelier in the Hardin Visitor Center
Chihuly Nepenthes Chandelier
in the Hardin Visitor Center
Chihuly Parterre Garden Installation
Chihuly Parterre Garden Installation

Near the Earth Goddess in the Cascades Garden, I saw this interesting Leopard plant:

Leopard Plant
Leopard Plant

And this Golden Sweet Flag which was used as a ground cover. I could not decide if I really liked it or not so I took the photo to preserve it until I decide.

Sweet Golden Flag
Sweet Golden Flag

I also preserved for memory this purple salvia because I was unaware of this color salvia being available. I have pink salvia but I am so found of anything purple.

Purple Salvia
Purple Salvia

Towards the end of our garden tour, we watched a food demonstration using farro grain, swiss chard and grated cheese in the Edible Garden.

Also in the Edible Garden, I was most impressed with a brick wall that had a muscadine grape stem growing up a wire. The wire then went out in a diagonal triangle (if I were a math expert, I’d know the name of that triangle) to the other side of the brick wall. Any gardener with a privacy fence could rig up a similar wire system to grow espaliered fruit.

Edible garden supported by wire
Edible garden supported by wire
Epicurus Quote in the Edible Garden
Epicurus Quote
in the Edible Garden

From the Edible Garden, we headed to the Great Lawn and the Fuqua Conservatory and Orchid Center.

ABG Orchid 1-1939

ABG Orchid 2-1941

Bromeliad
Bromeliad

The following five photos are plants I found interesting but were unlabeled. A lot of their plants were not labeled — a tremendous disappointment to a gardener. This next plant caught my eye because it could be used in the back of a border for contrast. I have no idea what it is.

Unknown tall red plant
Unknown tall red plant
This one might have been labeled - I didn't look
This one might have been labeled – I didn’t look
Leaves make it look like a ginger
Unknown yellow blooming plant
Unknown yellow blooming plant
Unknown plant hanging on a wall Fuqua Conservatory back entrance ?
Unknown plant hanging on a wall
Fuqua Conservatory back entrance ?
Unknown hanging plant I would like to own
Unknown hanging plant I would like to own
Another unknown plant I would like to own
Another unknown plant I would like to own

We had lunch somewhere in the garden. I couldn’t tell you because I didn’t have a map. Diane’s husband was carrying my map around in his pocket because I chose not to lug my 30 pound purse. The plate our lunch was served on was sensational, in my opinion. They were made from pressed leaves somewhere overseas, resembled bamboo and they all looked different. My excitement over the plates triggered another family discussion about “Crazy Relative Syndrome.” Now, I ask you, wouldn’t you have been impressed with a bamboo-like plate that was made from pressed leaves and was fully compostable? I was SO impressed I snuck four of the plates out of the place rather than placing them in the compost bins.

Plates made from pressed leaves
Plates made from pressed leaves

The gardener within me was also quite impressed with my sister’s trees. Covered with moss in a backyard getting too little sun. How cool is this?

Moss covered trees
Moss covered trees

Sorry it took so long to get this posted. My computer tried to croak on me. Thank God for my brother who fixed it.

16 thoughts on “ATLANTA BOTANICAL GARDEN PLANTS”

  1. Didn’t you just want to bring home one of everything you saw? I do, and I didn’t even make this trip with you.

    1. Believe it or not, no. I’m not getting any younger and I’ve got the injuries from the car accident that prevent me from working in the yard more than two hours sooooooooo, I’ve decided I can’t have one of everything. I did take photos of the things I would like to find and possess, most of which were unlabeled, so I was grateful to have a camera to record my wantings. Other things, like that Leopard plant, simply caught my eye but I recognized that it could become garden “sprawl” and I don’t need that either.

  2. I think you must have had the most AMAZING time. It seems there were so many magical things to see no matter where you looked. Thank you for sharing that abundance … and love the plates !!! Ginny

  3. Love the plates. I probably would have taken mine, too! Love all the photos. Wish I knew the name of your mystery plants, all I know is the one that you think is a ginger, is, but I don’t know what kind. I just planted a leopard plant after seeing one in person. Isn’t it a fabulous eye-catching plant? Photos don’t do it justice. I like the look of that golden flag, too. Looks like a fabulous place to visit.

  4. Oh just WOW! So much to look at, how did you manage to leave? A lot of the glamour for me is the fact that CO won’t let these lovelies grow outside year-round. That doesn’t mean I can’t admire! Love the Shrimp Plant and think I have a version of the succulent as it has the same upright growth and leaf shape. In spite of many years of gardening I’m not capable of rattling off the scientific leaf shape term, but I can damn well draw ya that shape!

    Sticks on Fire by name alone get my vote but I do like that ‘unruly’ growth. The Red Elephant looks like one of my Ligularia but NEVAH that big. Grape vines on a wire..sheesh, I have a huge arbor thing that could be guided to a fence…simple, so simple…on my list for next spring. Could go on and on! Thanks Jones, much appreciated, especially now that we are at the beginning of our hunker-down months.

    OH THE PLATES..all day long I would’a cottoned on to those (and prolly tried to get more!).

    1. WAH-HOO! I’ve got two votes now for the plates being kewel. Does Colorado have some heated greenhouses they run year round? The ABG did. They had one that was a tropical rainforest with roots hanging two or three stories from the ceiling. I gotta admit I was a leeetle freaked out in that room. Then they had another room that was a high desert. I didn’t take any photos in those rooms. I could have in the desert room but the rain forest was a tad dark. I photographed a FRACTION of what was there. I should have taken pictures of that suspended walkway. Going back next spring. Will do better. Yep, I’ve admired that Sticks on Fire for at least a year now. I have a very similar green pencil cactus but it’s just green. Glad to have shared some ideas with you.

  5. wonderful garden – the chandelier is amazing, and I love your sister’s trees. Pleased you’re having a lovely botanical holiday. The canary island wormwood is seeding again, and sends its regards.

  6. Crazy One – I am sure if you sent your photos of the things you liked but were not labeled to the ABG, they would tell you what they are. The ABG is a fine organization and has been one of our favorites for years. I must admit though that I was concerned they would not invite us to continue as members if they caught you stealing the plates instead of composting them for future plant food. Surprisingly, it seems many of your friends would have been helping you in the heist.

    1. I did see that I could email them the photos for identification but that requires me to re-do my photos without the “SRR” watermark. I wouldn’t want them to get curious and come over here and discover one of their members was related to a Crazy One. Your membership might be revoked! When I get time… I’m almost certain I was quite surreptitious in my removal of their compostable plates.

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