LIFE OF A PURPLE CONEFLOWER

Post last updated: November 4th, 2018

This is the photographic life cycle of a Purple Coneflower, Echinacea purpurea, as I have witnessed it by growing them for several years.

Photo of arrow shaped coneflower seeds
Coneflower seeds

 

I plant coneflower seeds in a pot and label them so that I know whether or not they germinate
I plant coneflower seeds in a pot and label the pot
so that I know whether or not they germinate

When the leaves are at the size shown above, they come out of the pot and go in the ground. The leaves will grow to four times this size before a flower stalk emerges.

bud
bud

 

bud with pink petals beginning to peek out on coneflower bud
bud with pink petals beginning to peek out

 

petal color emerging
petal color emerging

 

coneflower in full bloom; red cone has not matured
coneflower in full bloom; red cone has not matured

 

coneflower with circle of yellow pollen; cone is now mature
coneflower with circle of yellow pollen; cone is now mature

 

coneflower final stages-colors of flower petals and cone have faded-1817
pink petal color and orange cone color have faded
life cycle is nearly complete

The final stage is waiting for the cones to dry out and turn brown. The cones are then ready to collect for harvesting seed.

 

8 thoughts on “LIFE OF A PURPLE CONEFLOWER”

  1. … as opposed to my method of snipping off a cone, smushing it into the ground where I’d like another plant, forgetting that I did that and being surprised when a plant appears the next Spring.

    Some of my unorthodox methods cause me grief, like when I need a new path and have to either relocate some flowers or rethink the path location.

    1. Nell Jean – Nothing wrong with your “unorthodox” reseeding methods. It actually sounds like something my mother would have done. She was a big fan of digging a hole with the heel of her foot, dropping the seeds in and using her foot to cover them with soil. I like to trade seeds, though, and trying to send a cone through the mail would cost too much.

    1. Holleygarden – Growing from seed is a little slower for those who need instant gratification BUT it is more cost effective because you get more plants for your buck. Most of the seeds I buy at Home Depot are Burpee’s $1.00 packets. I also buy seeds from Swallowtail Garden Seeds (caution: they don’t include plant hardiness zones). I started out with Ferry Morse but they give you too few flower seeds.

Say something, will you? Your comment will appear after it is approved.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.